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COMMUNITY 

Nova believes that engaging with local people in the development of a tidal energy array is essential.

 

It enables communities and members of the public to learn more about the project and voice any questions and/or concerns they may have. This dialogue leads to a better understanding of local conditions, livelihoods, opportunities, and ways in which the community can get involved. 

 

We used this approach to great effect in the Shetland Islands in Scotland where we have built strong relationships. The input of local fishermen and the support of the local community made it possible to deliver the world’s first offshore tidal array.   

 

Input from the local community in Petit Passage is helping develop their wonderful tidal resource. We started engaging with local people, communities, companies, First Nations, and a range of different groups in Petit Passage and Nova Scotia in 2018, and we have come a long way since then. 

Engaging with the Nova Tidal Array

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Nova’s  preferred approach to engagement is personal, face-to-face meetings with communities and local groups.

 

However, the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown restrictions has limited this approach throughout 2020 and 2021. We have used other forms of engagement including phone calls and online meetings, but we hope to go back to face-to-face meetings once restrictions are lifted. 

 

Over the lifetime of the project, Nova will engage in the following ways: 

  • Public meetings and open houses with workshops and presentations 

  • Site visits 

  • Videos 

  • Newsletters 

  • Local media including newspapers, radio, TV and online 

  • Nova's website and social media 

Community benefits

The Nova Tidal Array brings the following benefits to the local community:  

  

  • Opportunities to boost the local economy – jobs, apprenticeships, and work for local companies including vessel, onshore and environmental monitoring services. 

  • A locally sourced and environmentally friendly solution to energy needs that works in harmony with the marine wildlife and has no visual impact. 

  • Educational resource for schools, colleges and universities who would like to learn more about tidal energy. 

  • Academic opportunities including research and development.

  • Cleaner air due to the reduction in the use of fossil fuels. 

  • Opportunities to find creative solutions for local energy needs e.g., the world’s first tidal powered EV charge point in Shetland here

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Interested groups and organisations 

 

Key groups and organisations involved with the Nova Tidal Array include:

Local community groups

Tidal Readiness Committee, Sustainable Oceans Applied Research (SOAR), Bay of Fundy Discovery Association, Digby Neck Collective  

Schools and academia

Nova Scotia Community College, Dalhousie University, Cape Breton University, Acadia University, St. Mary's University, Université Sainte-Anne, Digby Neck Consolidated School, Islands Consolidated School  

Local policy makers

Community of Parrsboro, Municipality of Cumberland, Municipality of Digby, Municipality of Clare, Municipality of Annapolis, Municipality of Kings, Municipality of West Hants, Community of Tiverton, Community of Freeport, Community of Westport, Community of East Ferry, Town of Digby, Westport Village Commissions  

Fishermen

Bay of Fundy Inshore Fisherman’s Association, Fishermen Scientists Research Society, Darren Porter, Mark Taylor, Seafood Producers Association of Nova Scotia, Full Bay Scallop Association, Local sea urchin dive fishery, Brazil Rock 33/34 Lobster Fishermen's Association, Coldwater Lobster Association, Maritime Fishermen’s Union Local 9, Nova Scotia Seafood Alliance, East Ferry Harbour Authority, Tiverton Harbour Authority  

Environmental groups

Mi'kmaq Conservation Group, FORCE's Citizens Liaison Committee, Fishermen Scientists Research Society, Tidal Readiness Committee, Ecology Action Centre, The Offshore Alliance, Sierra Club, Clean Annapolis River Program  

First Nation communities

Sipek’nekatik, Millbrook, Paqtnkek, Potlotek, We’koqma’q, 

Wagmatcook, Membertou, Eskasoni, Pictou Landing, Glooscap, Annapolis Valley, Bear River, Acadia  

First Nation organisations

Joint Economic Development Initiative (JEDI), Ulnooweg Development Group, Kwilmu’kw Maw-klusuaqn, Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat  

Regulators

Nova Scotia Department of Energy and Mines, Nova Scotia Department of Lands and Forestry, Nova Scotia Environment, Transport Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Natural Resources Canada  

Grid operator

Nova Scotia Power    

Landowners

Small Craft Harbours, Province of Nova Scotia

Businesses

Various businesses in Petit Passage and the supply chain across Nova Scotia. Nova has built an excellent relationship with its suppliers in Europe and it is replicating this in Nova Scotia.

Utility companies

Nova Scotia Power, Berwick Electric Light Commission 

Engaging with First Nation communities

We understand the importance of engaging with First Nation Communities and we value local knowledge and expertise. Nova holds regular meetings with First Nation communities and groups. and what is learned will be incorporated as the project develops. 

 

Engagement with Mi’kmaq Communities focuses on addressing concerns including displacement of Mi’kmaq fishing, potential impact to marine life, the potential environmental effects of noise, and sedimentation. 

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We understand the importance of engaging with First Nation Communities and we value local knowledge and expertise. Nova holds regular meetings with First Nation communities and groups. and what is learned will be incorporated as the project develops. 

 

Engagement with Mi’kmaq Communities focuses on addressing concerns including displacement of Mi’kmaq fishing, potential impact to marine life, the potential environmental effects of noise, and sedimentation.